The North Idaho Hunting Experience

Idaho hunting is some of the best around! 20.4 million acres of the state is National Forest, which is approximately 40%. There’s more than enough room for every type of hunter. There are different seasons for different types of animals, such as big game (deer, elk, bear, mountain lion, wolf, etc.), sheep, goat, moose, turkey, waterfowl and more! Idaho offers a season for 3 types of weapons – archery, rifle, and muzzle loader. Each season, unit and weapon have different rules, regulations, and dates. But there is so much more to the hunting experience

 

Getting Ready for the Hunt

Lots of planning has to go into getting ready for hunting, no matter which type of hunter you are. Check out the checklist below to get your planning started now:

  • Get into shape – hunting is a lot of work as you trek through the forest. And if you get your target, the work continues as you have to pack it out.
  • Get maps and start scouting – visit the places you intend to hunt. Get a lay of the land and find out the most visited areas.
  • Sight in your weapon & practice shooting – be sure your weapon is on target then continue practicing to make sure you hit the animal when it’s time.
  • Practice calling – if you’re going to call, practice before you get in the field, it can be hard to master.
  • Break in new boots – don’t want blisters to form during your hunts.
  • Buy your tag – buy it early while you’re thinking about it. Be sure it’s purchased before opening day.
  • Check the weather forecast – if you know what the weather will be, you can prepare appropriately.
  • Check batteries – check them in all your battery powered equipment and just in case, bring spares.
  • Sharpen knives – dull knives are more dangerous than sharp ones.
  • Get your pack gear together – use the gear list below to help with this.
  • Always tell people where you plan to hunt/camp – the more detailed the better. Be sure to let them know how long you’ll be gone, if you’ll ever be in cell range, etc. That way if an emergency comes up, those at home can reach you.

Gear

As every hunter know, there is so much gear when it comes to hunting. With all the necessary clothes for any possible temperature, pack gear, weapons, ammo, emergency gear, and then if you plan to camp that adds a whole other lists of gear. Below is just an overview of the type of gear you’ll need to pack and a link to a full list.

  • Weapons, ammo and hunting aidsImage result for hunting gear
  • Food and water
  • Navigation
  • Signaling
  • Emergencies
  • Communication
  • Unexpected night in the field
  • Camping
  • Clothing for all weather

Hunting Gear Checklist

 

Places to get Gear

Here in North Idaho, there is an abundance of options to purchase all you need for hunting, including clothing, equipment, and weapons.

Cabela’s

Black Sheep Sporting Goods

Tri State Outfitters

Sportsman’s Warehouse

North 40

Image result for idaho panhandle big game hunting areas

Big 5

Where to Hunt

As mentioned, Idaho is 40% national forest, so there are plenty of areas to hunt. A few favorites here in North Idaho are the St. Joe River, Avery and Coeur d’Alene River. But there are so many more options! Click here for Idaho’s Wildlife Management Areas.

 

 

 

Hunting for Visitors

Idaho is a desirable place to hunt and nonresidents are more than welcome to join! Unfortunately, tags and licenses for nonresidents to hunt is more than those of residents, so expect an added cost. Click here for a full list of licenses, tags and permits and how much they cost for nonresident hunters

If you’re not from Idaho or interested in hunting a new area, there are plenty of options for a guided hunt. Below are a list of area outfitters that do just that:

J & V Big Game Outfitters https://ucomontana.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/UCO-Hunt-It-29.jpg

BearPaw Outfitters

Clark Fork Outfitters

Shattuck Creek Outfitters

 

 

 

Safety & Survival Information

No matter which season, animal or weapon you decide to hunt, there are general safety guidelines you should always follow. These guidelines are good to follow anytime you’re in the forest, even if you’re not hunting. And if you lose your way, there are also some survival tips you should practice:

  • Know the area you’re hunting
  • Don’t rely solely on electronics
  • Let somebody know where you will be hunting and when you will be returning
  • Have a fire starter kit
  • Watch the weather
  • Know your general firearm safety and how to use your weapon appropriately
  • Don’t perform an awkward action while trying to shoot, such as climb a tree or cross a fence
  • Store ammunition and firearm separately

Related image

This is a very short list of safety and survival tips, click here for more hunting safety and here for survival tips.

 

Hunting Seasons

Big GameImage result for north idaho black bear

Big game is considered deer, elk, pronghorn, black bear, mountain lion and gray wolf. This season offers a variety of options depending on where you plan to hunt, which animal you’re after and which weapon you use. There are controlled hunting options, youth only options, private land permit options and so much more! If you’re new to the area and want to get know more about big game hunting options, check out the Idaho Fish & Game Brochure by clicking here.

 

Image result for north idaho mooseMoose, Bighorn Sheep & Mountain Goat

Although these animals may seem like big game, they are separate due to different rules and regulations. All moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goats are controlled only hunts in Idaho. That means you must apply for these tags and then a drawing occurs. There are only a certain number of tags per area so you are not guaranteed a tag, that’s why it’s called the lottery. If you are interested in obtaining one of these tags click here to read the Idaho Fish & Game Brochure. Please note, due to the smaller number of these types of animals, there are more rules and reporting requirements than other types of game. Interested in what your drawing odds would be, click here.

 

Idaho Migratory Game BirdImage result for Idaho Migratory Game Bird

Birds included in this season include duck, geese, drove, crow and crane. There are different and multiple types of species included in the hunts. Check out the Idaho Fish & Game brochure by clicking here.

The Upland Game, Furbearer and Turkey season includes grouse, quail, Chukar, Gray Partridge, pheasants, rabbits, hares and turkey with a different variety of some species. Certain varieties of the species are closed so you’ll want to know your bird if you choose to hunt. Learn how to identify which is which, as well as your limit and hunting dates by reading the Idaho Fish and Game brochure here.

 

Person Shooting Arrow from BowHelpful Links:

Getting Started

All the Idaho Seasons & Rules Booklets

Interactive Map

News

Hunting Areas

Unit Breakdown

 

Credit: OR Dept of Fish & Wildlife, MeatEater Hunting, 1.800.Gear

Posted on October 8, 2019 at 6:49 pm
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Helpful Tips | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fall Home Maintenance

The purchase of a home will likely be the biggest invest anybody will make in their life. Our homes are the centers of our lives because they hold everything and everyone important to us. Our top priorities are taking care of that invest.  Winter is a harsh season here in North Idaho as a result it can cause some damage to our homes, properties, our loved ones, or even our wallets! It can be avoided if we take extra steps this fall or start of winter to prepare.

The next question is where do I start? Not knowing can be overwhelming and stressful. Below is just a small list of some important home maintenance ideas. Included is the reason you should do them. It can make a huge difference on your home and property this year.

 

 

Interior

  • Windows & Doors ~Image result for inserting weather strippingInstall cool weather storm windows & doors, repair and/or replace loose or damaged window or door frames and insert weather stripping or caulking around windows & doors. This will all keep your house better insulated through winter.

 

 

  • Heating Systems ~Replace the filter in your furnace and clean your ducts to help your furnace’s efficiency and help save money

 

  • PlumbingImage result for insulating pipes for winterBe sure your pipes are well insulated to help avoid freezing. You’ll also want to know where the water shut off valve is in case your pipes do freeze.  Be sure to remove hoses from hose bibs on your home in colder weather so that your bibs and frost fee bibs don’t freeze in the low temperatures, causing leaks in the warmer months.  

 

 

  • Ventilation ~Image result for checking attic ventilation Check the eave vents to be sure it’s clear of insulation and other debris to prevent mold.  Clean out your dryer vents to protect from possible ignition.  Close your foundation vents durning the fall and winter to keep pipes in your crawl space from freezing. 

 

  • Safety Devices ~ Now is a good time of year to check all your safety devices to be sure you can make it through winter. Check the expiration date on your fire extinguishers, test your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors (changing the batteries if necessary) and test your home for radon.

 

Exterior

  • Gutters & DownspoutsImage result for outside home maintenance in fallClean our your gutters and downspouts of debris to put a stop to any possible rot and to keep your gutters in proper working order

 

  • Chimney & Fireplace ~ Have a professional inspect & clean your chimney  to help avoid chimney fires. Test your fireplace flue for a tight seal when it’s closed to prevent water getting into your chimney.

 

  • Landscaping & Outside Work Image result for outside home maintenance in fallTrim any limbs that are close to power lines, cover or store your patio furniture, check your walkways, stairs and driveway for easier winter navigation. To help promote yard growth, you could fertilize and reseed your lawn as well as prune your trees and shrubs.

 

 

  • Air ConditionersRelated imageIf you have a window AC unit, be sure to remove it and store in a dry play before winter. Or cover your AC unit with a piece of plywood held down by bricks. This will help protect the unit from falling debris but also continue to allow airflow. You don’t want to put a waterproof cover over it during winter because it creates a warm environment which attracts unwanted guests.
Posted on September 11, 2019 at 9:48 pm
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Helpful Tips, Home & Projects, Keeping it Real - With John & Tracey | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fire Safety

As fire season continues, it’s good to take a moment and review some fire safety tips for both in the home and while outdoors. Having the basic knowledge may help prevent a home fire or a wildfire.

 

 

Outdoors

Below are 3 steps to follow when you have a fire outdoors:

Image result for campfire safety

  • Picking Your Campfire Spot: Be sure you follow any rules or regulations if planning to build a pit in a campground. Ensure you pick a level spot and you are approximately 10-15 feet away from anything that could catch fire. This includes low hanging branches, trees/shrubs, and your own gear. Take the weather into account as well, for example if there will be high wind and which direction it’s going in. Make sure rocks line the pit so your fire stays within the boarder.

 

  • While You Maintain Your Fire: Once your fire is going, do not add dangerous items such as aerosol cans, pressurized containers or aluminum cans. This items could explode, cause harmful fumes or shatter. Keep your fire at a manageable size. If it gets too large it could easily become out of hand with no way to put it out on your own. Also, always watch it. This is especially true if there are pets or children nearby. As a safety precaution, always have water close by.

 

  • Extinguishing Your Fire: If possible, let you fire burn down to ash. Then, pour water over all the embers, not just the red ones, until the hissing sounds spots. You could also put dirt or sand over the fire, if water isn’t available. Continue adding the water or dirt/sand, stirring around with a shovel, until everything is cool. Never walk away or go to bed when your fire is still warm.

 

General Safety Tips to Help Prevent a Wildfire:

 

Image result for wildfire

 

  • Be careful while camping and using & fueling fueling lanterns, stoves, and heaters. Make sure it’s cool before refueling. Do your best not to spill flammable liquids and store appropriately.

 

  • Do not dispose of your cigarettes, matches or any smoking material out of a moving vehicle or anywhere near an area that could catch fire. Always put your cigarette out before disposing of it.

 

  • When burning yard waste, avoid burning in windy conditions. Have a shovel, water and fire retardant nearby and avoid all flammable materials from your yard. Follow all fire rules, such as not letting the fire get out of hand, ALWAYS keep an eye on it and put it out completely before walking away.

 

  • If you notice an unattended or out of control fire, contact your local fire department or 9-1-1.

 

  • If using fireworks, consider wetting down the grass and surrounding areas before lighting them. Always have a bucket of water, garden hose or fire extinguisher ready nearby. Avoid lighting fireworks on a windy night.

 

 

At HomeImage result for home smoke detector in a fire

Below is 6 ways to prevent a fire in your home and help to avoid injury:

  • Smoke Alarms: Be sure you have the correct number of smoke alarms installed in your home. Test them once a month to ensure they are still is working order. Have spare batteries in your home so if the batteries die, you can replace them right away. Replace them at least once a year. Learn more about smoke alarms by clicking here, such as how many and where to install in your home.

 

  • Fire Extinguishers: They are a good idea to have to put out a small fire in your home or garage. Go over the 5 different types of fire extinguishers to be sure you have the correct one. Be sure your fire extinguisher is checked and tested regularly by a professional. Also, make sure you know how to use the fire extinguisher by following the P.A.S.S. rule below:
    • Pull the pin. Hold the extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away from you and release the locking mechanism.
    • Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.
    • Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.
    • Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.

 

  • Teach Your Children the Basics: Don’t let them play with matches, candles or fire and teach them that it can be dangerous. Show your child what the smoke alarm sounds like and what to do when one goes off. If your child is old enough teach them not to touch a door knob if it’s hot, how to stop drop & roll, to crawl on the ground when they see smoke, and not to hide under a bed or in a closet if there is a fire. And if you have the opportunity, go to a fire station and have them meet a firefighter so they can be familiar with what they do and their gear.

 

Image result for fire escape plan

  • Create A Fire Escape Plan: Draw your home’s floor plan that shows all the windows & doors. Make a plan of escape and go over it with your family, be sure there are at least 2 ways to get out of ever room, if possible. Have a spot you meet your family once outside. And be sure to practice the plan at least twice a year. Click here for a printable sheet to draw out your escape.

 

  • Create A Family Emergency Communication Plan: Be sure every family member knows who to contact in case they can not find one another. This goes for any type of emergency, not just a fire. Also, be sure everybody know how to properly use 9-1-1.

 

  • Stay Safe When Grilling: Do not use your grill unless it’s away from siding, decking or anything that could catch fire. Make sure your children and pets remain at least 3 feet away from the grill when it’s in use. Always stay with your grill when using it and clean it regularly.

 

 

Although it’s impossible to guarantee a fire will never get started in your home or your camp fire never gets out of hand, taking the precautions and steps above can help avoid it from happening. Always stay safe!

 

Credit: American Red Cross, Safety.com, U.S. Fire Administration, SmokeyBear, Active.com, FEMA, National Geographic

Posted on August 9, 2019 at 2:24 pm
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Helpful Tips | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Boating Safety

One thing you can almost be sure of is at some point you will find yourself on a boat during the summer here in North Idaho. With the numerous amount of lakes and rivers, it’s near impossible not to enjoy boat life, even if it’s only for a day. Whether you’re an avid boater, only enjoy it every now and then or are just getting into boating, it’s always a good idea to know the basics of boating safety before leaving the dock.

 

Image result for boating

 

1. Check the Weather Before You Leave

Be sure to check the weather of your route and destination, including the water conditions, before you depart. You can’t always tell a storm will roll in just by looking outside.

 

2. Have the Proper Gear Onboard

You never know if or when you’ll have an emergency. Being sure you have all the proper gear onboard will help avoid additional issues and will ensure you’re prepared for every type of situation. Check out a full checklist here!

 

3. Be Aware of Carbon Monoxide

Always maintain fresh air circulation in your boat and be sure you and others on the boat are aware of carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms. Click here to learn more about CO & CO poisoning.

 

4. Take a Boat Safety Course & Know the Rules

There are several different courses you can take online for boat safety that you can receive certification for them. Check out the list here.

Knowing your rules will ensure you and other boaters safety. Check out the navigation rules here.

 

 

5. Get your Boat Checked

You can receive a free boat check! The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and U.S. Power Squadrons both offer that service. These checks make sure you have the proper safety equipment and that they are in the proper condition per state and federal regulations. Find out how to get your check scheduled by clicking here.

 

6. Use Common Sense

Many of the rules on the water are consistent with the rules on the road. Stay alert, operate at a safe speed, make sure passengers are following safety measures, avoid alcohol use when driving and stay clear of the engine are examples of just a few.

Image result for boating in north idaho

 

7. Follow Proper Procedures

Knowing and following proper docking & anchoring procedures are an important part of boating. Depending on the type or boat you have and the weather conditions, the procedures you need to follow could be different. Be sure you know what to do.

 

 

Credit: Discover Boating & Nationwide

Posted on July 30, 2019 at 10:05 pm
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Helpful Tips, Life on the Lake, Things to Do and See in North Idaho | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

January’s Market Update – Is this a good time to sell?

Is this a good time to sell?

Here is your housing snapshot for January 2017  showing an increase of 10% in median home prices and time on market down 5% in Kootenai County.   If you are a seller who is on the fence about putting your home on the market, this snapshot is a good indication that this might be a very good time for you to sell your home.

A market offering higher median home prices,  shorter closing time frames and less inventory will give sellers who decide to list now have some real advantages especially this time of year.

Listing your home before the masses who wait for better weather in April and May can give you the edge for success.  Low inventory combined with a large number of qualified buyers creates competition for your listing.  Many buyers have already lost out on another home and these buyers are ready to pounce once your listing hits the MLS.  Homes that are show ready and priced right are garnering multiple offers at full price and often offers over full price!

If you would like to be kept up to date on the market or know more about selling your home or the value of your home, contact us and we will be happy to provide you with a customized market analysis.

 

Kootenai County Snapshot for January 2017

 


 
Johnandtracey
John and Tracey
Your Professional Agents

 
208-818-2365 John         johntindall@windermere.com        
208-818-2456 Tracey     traceytindall@windermere.com
Website                               www.johnandtracey.com

 

 

Posted on March 3, 2017 at 6:08 am
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Costs and Spending | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

June Snapshot – Kootenai County!

Summertime in North Idaho and our market remains Healthy! 

Have any questions about buying or selling? Wondering if its the right time for you? Contact us and lets discuss it and let us provide you all the information you need to make an informed decision to move forward or to wait.  We are here to help! 

 

 

Johnandtracey-June 
 

Johnandtracey

John and Tracey
Your Professional Agents

 

 
208-818-2365 John        johntindall@windermere.com        
208-818-2456 Tracey     traceytindall@windermere.com
Website                         www.johnandtracey.com

 


 

Posted on July 11, 2016 at 5:36 pm
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Real Estate Trends | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How will this election effect our Real Estate Market?

Election season is here.  Will this next election have an impact on our real estate market?  Here is what Windermere’s Chief Economist, Matthew Gardner, has to say about this subject.

Here in North Idaho we are enjoying a very healthy real estate market and we all want to see this continue.  I know we all have our candidate and beliefs about who should be in office and what they can accomplish – I am no different.  I do believe once we have a new president elect in office and things settle in, we will be back on track, no matter who is elected… my candiate or yours 🙂 

 

Posted on July 5, 2016 at 8:25 pm
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Real Estate Trends | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Buyer Fatigue – Is it Real?

Our market is healthy here in North Idaho and if you are looking for homes in certain price ranges, the fatigue is real!  The competition is fierce.  So johnandtracey.commany buyers competing for a small number of homes not only stressful but exhausting. Finding the right home and ready to make an offer just to find out another offer or two are accepted before you can even get yours submitted.  Making several offers just to be edged out and having to start from ground zero.  Is this you?

How can you get ahead in this market and go from making offers to getting yours accepted?  A professional fulll time and strategic agent is how!   Well-trained, battle ready and ready to compete for you!  An agent who understands this market  and has a proven strategy for your success.   

Read more about buyer fatigue

Going it alone? Not finding success with what you have been trying… its time for a change.  You need a plan for success and we have one!  We have successfully found our buyers homes within the first week or less.  We know about homes before they are listed and have strategies that are success proven.  Have questions, let's connect. 

 

How to contact John and Tracey

John Tindall: 208-818-2456   johntindall@windermere.com

Tracey Tindall: 208-818-2365  traceytindall@windermere.com

Click here to learn: More about us!

Posted on June 25, 2016 at 2:11 am
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Real Estate Trends | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New-Home Sales on the Rise!

New Home Sales Surge Past Post Recession High!

Sales of new single-family homes climbed 16.6 percent in April, reaching the highest sales pace since January 2008, the Commerce Department reported this week. Newly built, single-family homes rose to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 619,000 units in April.  Read more…  

North Idaho's market is healthy with residential sales at a 12% increase over April.  **

Johnandtraceyareastats

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JohnandtraceyHousingMarketIndex

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Housing Market Index : National Association of Home Builders   
**Source: Pioneer Title

How to contact John and Tracey

John Tindall: 208-818-2456   johntindall@windermere.com

Tracey Tindall: 208-818-2365  traceytindall@windermere.com

Click here to learn: More about us!

Posted on June 3, 2016 at 7:30 pm
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Real Estate Trends | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Birds Eye View of Coeur d’Alene

Here is a quick look at our beautiful Coeur d'Alene – A great place to live and play!   Have questions about the area? Where to go and what to do? Thinking of visiting or maybe even relocating?  Give us a call we can help you with all things Coeur d'Alene and North Idaho.

 

 

 

How to contact John and Tracey

John Tindall: 208-818-2456   johntindall@windermere.com

Tracey Tindall: 208-818-2365  traceytindall@windermere.com

Click here to learn: More about us!

 

Posted on May 29, 2016 at 5:21 am
John and Tracey Tindall | Category: Best of CDA | Tagged , , , , , , ,